What’s New

What’s New

  • World AIDS Day 2016

    Today and every day, WEI/Bantwana strives to improve the wellbeing of vulnerable children and their caregivers and families affected by HIV and AIDS and poverty.

    We strive to help all vulnerable children—especially adolescent girls and young women—live HIV free.

    Yearly, there are around 380,000 new HIV infections among young womeno-greater-action-is-neededn aged 15-24. These young women are often left without a voice or control of their own bodies. They are prevented from protecting themselves against HIV due to reasons such as gender-based violence, lack of access to health services, lack of access to education, and policies that do not translate into action.

    We believe, however, that together we can end AIDS by 2030. In agreement with AIDS.gov, it is going to take leadership, commitment, and impact to make it happen.

    Join us in celebrating the progress we and our partners have made and in reaffirming our shared commitment to end AIDS by 2030. Below are links to our social media accounts, where we will be posting statistics and information about our efforts throughout the day, and additional information about our programming and success stories.

    Follow us. Engage with us.

    Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Instagram  |  16 Days GBV Campaign

    Bantwana Fact Sheet

    Fact Sheet bantwanaonepager_hivfocus-1

    DREAMS Programming

    DREAMS  – bantwanadreams_onepager_a4

    Country Fact Sheets – Mozambique, Swaziland, Uganda, Zimbabwe

    DREAMS Innovation

    Success Stories

    Pamoja Tuwalee (Tanzania) – Steven

    DREAMS (Uganda) – Anna and Flavia

    BETTER OUTCOMES (Uganda) – Jennifer, RoseVicki

    International AIDS Conference 2016 Poster

    School-based HIV prevention education for the world’s highest HIV prevalence population

    Today and every day, WEI/Bantwana strives to improve the wellbeing of vulnerable children and their caregivers and families affected by HIV and AIDS and poverty. We strive to help all vulnerable children—especially adolescent girls and young women—live HIV free. Yearly, there are around 380,000 new HIV infections among young women aged 15-24. These young women are often left ...
  • 16 Days of Activism Against GBV

    It is estimated that 35% of women and girls worldwide have experienced gender-based violence (GBV). GBV is a social and human rights problem that is rooted in social inequalities among men and women. It is a problem that occurs in all parts of the globe, and while GBV has gained more attention over the years, it remains inadequate.

    Gender-based violence covers child sexual abuse, sex trafficking, sexual assault, domestic violence, early child marriage, violence in schools, female genital mutilation/cutting, forced labor and more. Roughly 70 million women have been married before the age of 18, and 120 million have experienced forced intercourse or other forced sexual acts at some point. Even with an alarmingly high number of women and girls suffering different forms of violence every day, fewer than 40% ever report it.

    This year, the Bantwana Initiative is participating in 16 Days of Activism against Gender-Based Violence under the campaign’s theme, “From Peace in the Home to Peace in the World: Make Education Safe for All.” WEI/Bantwana knows that education is one of the the most effective ways to end GBV and is committed to helping make public spaces, schools and homes safe for all women and girls worldwide!

    Get Involved!

    Join Bantwana in taking part of the 16 Days campaign by following us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

    Watch a video based on the true story of a GBV survivor in Zimbabwe, and learn how we empower survivors of GBV to access comprehensive medical, psychosocial, and legal support in Zimbabwe.

    Make a donation to support World Education/Bantwana’s work to reduce gender-based violence.

    Check out a new photo essay, ’10 Ways to Empower Girls’ to find out how World Education and Bantwana are working to topple the gender barriers that prevent girls form getting an education.

    Download our tools and resources on gender and GBV:

    Learn more about a few of our upcoming projects:

    Learn more about our current GBV projects or innovations:

    It is estimated that 35% of women and girls worldwide have experienced gender-based violence (GBV). GBV is a social and human rights problem that is rooted in social inequalities among men and women. It is a problem that occurs in all parts of the globe, and while GBV has gained more attention over the years, ...
  • Bantwana DREAMS at #AIDS2016!

    Just announced by the DREAMS Partnership at the International Aids Conference in Durban, South Africa: World Education has been selected as a DREAMS Innovation Challenge winner!

    Our solution was selected from more than 800 ideas to bring innovative, high-impact approaches to empower young women and adolescent girls in 10 Sub-Saharan African countries to live HIV-free. We’re excited to continue our role as a DREAMS implementer in Zimbabwe, Swaziland, Uganda, and Mozambique and a PEPFAR OVC implementing partner in Tanzania.

    For this challenge, we will work to increase secondary school retention among pregnant girls and young mothers in Swaziland, Tanzania, and Zimbabwe. Keeping girls in secondary school dramatically reduces their vulnerability to HIV infection. Therefore, we will develop an early warning system to detect girls most at risk of dropout, address harmful norms, and link them to health services.

    “While we have made considerable progress in the global response to HIV/AIDS, it remains the leading cause of death for adolescent girls in Africa, and girls account for 75% of all new HIV infections among adolescents. This must change.”   – Ambassador Deborah L. Birx

    As a DREAMS Innovation Challenge winner, we will strive to help drive those changes! Congratulations to all the other winners, and thank you U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR); Janssen Pharmaceutica NV (Janssen), one of the Janssen pharmaceutical companies of Johnson & Johnson; and ViiV Healthcare!

    Just announced by the DREAMS Partnership at the International Aids Conference in Durban, South Africa: World Education has been selected as a DREAMS Innovation Challenge winner! Our solution was selected from more than 800 ideas to bring innovative, high-impact approaches to empower young women and adolescent girls in 10 Sub-Saharan African countries to live HIV-free. We’re excited to continue our ...
  • Bantwana DREAMS Programming

    The Bantwana Initiative is currently implementing DREAMS Innovation Challenge funds in Mozambique, Swaziland, Uganda, and Zimbabwe. The DREAMS Innovation Challenge (DREAMS-IC) is a joint initiative between PEPFAR, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Girl Effect, Johnson & Johnson, Gilead Sciences, and Viiv Healthcare with the goal of helping adolescent girls and young women become Determined, Resilient, Empowered, AIDS-free, Mentored, and Safe Women.

    As recipient of DREAMS-IC funds, Bantwana incorporates DREAMS objectives with existing programming for orphans and vulnerable children. Bantwana will focus on strengthening comprehensive services to reduce the risk of HIV infection among adolescent girls and young women in these four DREAMS-IC priority countries.

    Uganda

    In Uganda, Bantwana provides adolescent girls and young women an array of life skills (HIV prevention, adolescent reproductive and sexual health, child protection) and economic strengthening interventions. Bantwana’s DREAMS interventions will help adolescent girls protect themselves from HIV and abuse while offering career guidance and building their financial literacy and entrepreneurial skills. Bantwana will:

    • Implement parenting groups for caregivers and teens to strengthen intergenerational communication to help participants discuss sensitive topics like reproductive health and HIV prevention
    • Use parasocial workers who are trained in community case management to help link girls and caregivers to critical services along the HIV continuum as well as other important socio-economic services
    • Encourage caregivers and girls to enroll in financial savings groups to build household resiliency to crisis

    Mozambique

    In Mozambique, the DREAMS program will target more than 158,850 adolescent girls and young women between the ages of 10 and 24 in three provinces, including girls who are in- and out-of-school, pregnant, and or postpartum and breastfeeding. Key interventions include sexual and reproductive health radio listening programs, school and community girls’ clubs, and sporting events with on-site gender-based violence (GBV) prevention outreach services and HIV service providers. Bantwana will:

    • Encourage caregivers to participate in financial savings groups to increase economic resilience and help keep girls in school
    • Establish parenting groups to help participants overcome barriers around sexuality and sexual health risk conversations with their children
    • Launch a case management referral system to help the most vulnerable girls and their families through home visits and will strengthen coordinated service providers

    Zimbabwe

    In Zimbabwe, the Bantwana DREAMS project is offering 3,000 young women a comprehensive package of services to improve their health and well-being. Among the many efforts, Bantwana will:

    • Establish  internal savings and lending (ISAL) clubs to build members’ financial skills
    • Provide entrepreneurial skills training to help participants start small businesses
    • Link work readiness model with internships in private and public sector companies to prepare girls for employment
    • Train all girls with a GBV prevention curriculum that emphasizes adolescent sexual reproductive health education and HIV prevention

    Swaziland

    In Swaziland, Bantwana supports DREAMS programming as a sub-grantee to PACT, reaching 2,550 girls and young women between the ages of 10 and 24 with life skills and health education services in the Lubombo region. Key DREAMS platforms for Swaziland include:

    • Volunteer-run clubs for in-and-out of school adolescent girls
    • Health clubs attached to local clinics for HIV-positive adolescent boys and girls
    • Referrals for testing, treatment, and support for HIV-positive adolescents
    • Tracking treatment and adherence for HIV-positive adolescents
    • School grants to cover school fees for at-risk girls
    The Bantwana Initiative is currently implementing DREAMS Innovation Challenge funds in Mozambique, Swaziland, Uganda, and Zimbabwe. The DREAMS Innovation Challenge (DREAMS-IC) is a joint initiative between PEPFAR, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Girl Effect, Johnson & Johnson, Gilead Sciences, and Viiv Healthcare with the goal of helping adolescent girls and young women become Determined, Resilient, ...
  • David Beckham Visits Bantwana-Supported Clinic in Swaziland

    David Beckham, international soccer star, paid an unheralded visit to a Bantwana-supported clinic in Swaziland on June 8, 2016. The former captain of the English national football team and UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador was there to help raise awareness about orphaned and vulnerable youth.

    Bantwana runs a support group for adolescent girls affected by HIV at the Siphofaneni Clinic as part of a broader project designed to reduce the high prevalence of HIV throughout Swaziland.

    David Beckham, Bantwana Initiative, Swaziland

    David Beckham spoke with children when visiting the Siphofaneni Clinic in Swaziland. Photo: Daily Mail.

    Fifteen HIV positive adolescent mothers and their children arrived at Siphofaneni expecting to meet with their support group. They were surprised to enter the facility and instead see superstar Beckham meeting with children.
    Beckham then took the time to speak with each mother individually; learning their stories and spending quality time with their children.

    Read about the visit in BellaAfrica. Thank you, David Beckham, for advocating for the vulnerable women and children working to function as healthy, productive members of their communities.

    David Beckham, international soccer star, paid an unheralded visit to a Bantwana-supported clinic in Swaziland on June 8, 2016. The former captain of the English national football team and UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador was there to help raise awareness about orphaned and vulnerable youth. Bantwana runs a support group for adolescent girls affected by HIV at the ...
  • New video highlights youth livelihoods development in Zimbabwe

    World Education’s Bantwana Initiative has produced a new video that highlights the issues facing youth around employment and livelihoods development in Zimbabwe and across southern Africa.

    Check out the video, The Bantwana Initiative: Youth Entrepreneurship and Work Readiness Program, on YouTube.

    Our new video, The Bantwana Initiative: Youth Entrepreneurship and Work Readiness Program, highlights the issues facing youth around employment and livelihoods development in Zimbabwe and across southern Africa.
  • Bantwana Mourns the Loss of Teresa Mendoza

    It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of Teresa Mendoza, the chief of party for Bantwana’s Teresa MendozaForça a Comunidade e Crianças (FCC) – Child and Community Strengthening Project in Mozambique.

    Teresa contracted cerebral malaria and died suddenly on January 13, 2016. Her death is a huge shock for our team in-country in Mozambique and for our Boston-based colleagues.

    Teresa originally hailed from Bolivia, but had worked for more than 12 years in Mozambique. She had an easy-going personality and was widely respected and loved by both colleagues and friends. Her approach to development, in depth experience of the HIV sector, and sensitivity to working closely with local government and communities was much valued and more than 100 people attended a leaving ceremony for her in Chimoio last week. She is missed.

    It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of Teresa Mendoza, the chief of party for the Força Project in Mozambique.
  • World Education’s work with vulnerable children in Zimbabwe highlighted

    A blog post by Nicole Brown from the Global Social Service Workforce Alliance, Improving Access to Services for Children and Families Through Collaboration Among Health Workers and Social Service Workers, highlights Bantwana’s work with vulnerable children in Zimbabwe.

    Ms. Brown’s blog focuses on her visit to Zimbabwe where she met community-level child care workers (CCWs) in the Chinotimba area. Her blog highlights their process for gaining certification as child care workers. In conversations she learned how CCWs have gained the trust of their neighbors and engage community members in identifying children in need of their help. The CCWs work with the Child Protection Committee and Village Health Worker to implement an integrated approach to addressing the children’s overall well-being.

    Ms. Brown ends by pointing out that it takes a strong social service workforce to provide the best care for vulnerable populations. At Bantwana, we couldn’t agree more.

    A blog post by Nicole Brown from the Global Social Service Workforce Alliance, Improving Access to Services for Children and Families Through Collaboration Among Health Workers and Social Service Workers, highlights Bantwana’s work with vulnerable children in Zimbabwe. Ms. Brown’s blog focuses on her visit to Zimbabwe where she met community-level child care workers (CCWs) in the ...
  • Bantwana ambassadors attend child advisory board meeting

    April 10, 2015

    Bantwana ambassadors and top Zimbabwean musicians Mai Olivia Charamba, Alexio Kawara, and Cynthia Mare attended an April child advisory board meeting to lend their support for ending child abuse and gender based violence in Zimbabwe.

    Child advisory board meetings are run by youth delegates from all over the country.  The meetings allow children to discuss important issues that affect their lives with local organizations that conduct youth activities.

    At the meeting, Charamba, Kawara, and Mare all voiced the need to educate people against the dangers of child abuse.  The three became Bantwana ambassadors at the beginning of 2015 as part of Bantwana’s Gender Based Violence Prevention and Response Program.  The musicians have been using their public images to spread awareness about gender based violence and abuse by attending local events and contributing PSAs on TV and social media.

    Their visit to the advisory board meeting was profiled by Zimbabwe news outlets The Herald and News Day.

    April 10, 2015 Bantwana ambassadors and top Zimbabwean musicians Mai Olivia Charamba, Alexio Kawara, and Cynthia Mare attended an April child advisory board meeting to lend their support for ending child abuse and gender based violence in Zimbabwe. Child advisory board meetings are run by youth delegates from all over the country.  The meetings allow children to ...
  • New motorbikes improve service delivery in Tanzania

    April 4, 2015

    The Bantwana Initiative’s Pamoja Tuwalee program was recently featured in an article by Tanzania’s IPP Media for its role donating motorbikes to help reach vulnerable children in Tanzania with necessary services.

    Pamoja Tuwalee gave 14 motorcycles to district councils and NGOs for use by their health and social workers to reach children in remote areas.  The new set of bikes will ensure that children continue to receive services after the project ends in November 2015.

    Funded by USAID, Pamoja Tuwalee strengthens local partner organizations providing a range of services to vulnerable children and families in Tanzania.

    Read the complete article from IPP Media>>

     

    April 4, 2015 The Bantwana Initiative’s Pamoja Tuwalee program was recently featured in an article by Tanzania’s IPP Media for its role donating motorbikes to help reach vulnerable children in Tanzania with necessary services. Pamoja Tuwalee gave 14 motorcycles to district councils and NGOs for use by their health and social workers to reach children in remote ...