What’s New

What’s New

  • Youth Soaring to Success through IFLY!

    WEI/Bantwana will participate in the 2017 Global Youth Economic Opportunities Summit in Washington, D.C. from September 27 – 29.

    The Global Youth Economic Opportunities Summit is a global convening that brings together 500+ leading stakeholders from 55 countries to connect, exchange, and collaborate. The 2017 Global Youth Economic Opportunities Summit theme will explore what the future of work holds for young people in developing contexts and for professionals working to expand youth economic opportunities globally in a changing world of work.

    Focusing on tracks “Building a Foundation” and “Livelihoods through Self-Employment,” WEI/Bantwana will present a poster on the African Youth Empowerment and Development Initiative (AYEDI)’s IFLY pathway.

    IFLY, or Integrated Funcational Literacy for Youth, recruits out-of-school adolescent youth (15 – 17 years old) and bolsters their literacy and numeracy in addition to practical skills, such as market-linked livelihoods selection; business plan development; and procurement, marketing, and financial planning. Small initial capital investments, ongoing mentorship, support from family, and a team of peers help youth launch and maintain decent work livelihood activities.

    Summit attendees, join us on Wednesday, September 27 from 5:30 – 7pm in Sky View for the poster session! You will have the opportunity to engage directly with our Uganda Program Officer and explore how our latest program findings can advance your own work.

    WEI/Bantwana will participate in the 2017 Global Youth Economic Opportunities Summit in Washington, D.C. from September 27 – 29. The Global Youth Economic Opportunities Summit is a global convening that brings together 500+ leading stakeholders from 55 countries to connect, exchange, and collaborate. The 2017 Global Youth Economic Opportunities Summit theme will explore what the future of work holds ...
  • Working Toward Education for All in Zimbabwe

    April 11, 2017

    The Sunday Mail, a Zimbabwean newspaper, recently published an article highlighting Zimbabwe’s nonformal education program. The initiative provides educational services to children, adolescents, and adults unable to complete formal schooling because of financial or social concerns. It was introduced by the Government of Zimbabwe and receives support from external organizations including Bantwana.

    Nonformal education (NFE) encompasses a variety of programs, such as basic literacy, adult basic education, part-time and continuing education (PTCE), and a functional literacy program which applies academic skills to further entrepreneurial and financial success.

    The Zimbabwe NFE program endeavors to provide education services to those who lack formal schooling, but have met enrollment challenges for a variety of reasons. Chief among the barriers to enrollment is students’ inability to cover the fees necessary to pay NFE class teachers and keep the program running. Another factor that negatively affects enrollment is a lack of awareness about the program amongst people who would otherwise be ideal candidates for NFE. Bantwana is working with the Education Coalition of Zimbabwe and the Ministry of Primary and Secondary Education to increase awareness about the program, thereby strengthening enrollment.

    World Education/Bantwana supports nonformal education in Zimbabwe through the Second Chance Education model, which is a part of its diverse portfolio of programs in Zimbabwe, spanning health, child protection, economic strengthening, and education. This second chance education model, like nonformal education, aims to provide education to marginalized children who have been forced to drop out of formal schooling due to difficult life circumstances. Second Chance Education targets orphaned children, HIV-positive children, and those who have had to shoulder the burden of homelessness or becoming the head of household after losing their parents.

    Bantwana is proud to support the Ministry of Primary and Secondary Education and the Government of Zimbabwe in delivering alternative education options to children and adults who would not receive schooling otherwise. Nonformal education is a chance to provide youth with the skills they need for social, academic, and financial success.

    Read the article, Non-formal education: Alternative pathway, on The Sunday Mail website.
    Learn more about our work in Zimbabwe and the Second Chance Education Program.

    April 11, 2017 The Sunday Mail, a Zimbabwean newspaper, recently published an article highlighting Zimbabwe’s nonformal education program. The initiative provides educational services to children, adolescents, and adults unable to complete formal schooling because of financial or social concerns. It was introduced by the Government of Zimbabwe and receives support from external organizations including Bantwana. Nonformal education ...
  • Official Launch of the Força à Comunidade e às Crianças (Child and Community Strengthening Project)!

    March 19, 2017

    Bantwana officially launched the Força à Comunidade e às Crianças (Child and Community Strengthening Project) (FCC) Project on March 17, 2017, in Beira city, Sofala Province. The FCC Project aims to to reduce the socio-economic impact of HIV/AIDS on Orphaned & Vulnerable Children (OVC) and their caregivers by enhancing the capacity of families and communities to support, protect, and care for OVC and caregivers.

    Seventy invited guests participated in the launch including, national, provincial and district level government officials; staff from WEI/B headquarters in Boston; local community leaders; public and private sector stakeholders; international and local implementing partners and project beneficiaries. Beneficiaries from Child Rights Clubs (CRCs) participated directly by presenting skits during the launch.

    During the Provincial Governor representative’s speech, he assured participants that the Government in Sofala gives its full support to the FCC project. He specifically  addressed representatives in the audience from both the the Ministry of Gender, Children, and Social Action and the Ministry of Education and Human Resources Development, and asked them:

    “Please inform the honourable ministers that the provincial government in Sofala will fully support the FCC project.”

    The FCC Project is a five-year project made possible with support from the American people through the United States Agency for International Development (USAID). WEI/B, under FCC, works in collaboration with the Government of Mozambique, national and provincial level technical partners, and local implementing partners to address vulnerabilities of OVC and their families by drawing on and implementing tested, prevention, care and support models. FCC is being  implemented in four Provinces (Manica, Sofala, Zambézia and Gaza) and 12 districts (Manica, Chimoio Gondola, Nhamatanda, Dondo, Beira, Nicodala, Namacura, Quelimane, Xai Xai city, Xai Xai district and Chokwe).

    Within the FCC Project is the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) DREAMS Initiative (a two-year project), which has a specific focus on adolescent girls and young women aged 10 to 24 years. The objective of this initiative is to reduce new HIV infections by at least 25% by providing different youth-friendly services that support girls to be Determined, Resilient, Empowered, AIDS-free, Mentored, and Safe (DREAMS).

    FCC Project aims to reach 118,757 beneficiaries, including 90,504 OVC and their caregivers, and 28,253 adolescent girls and young women through the DREAMS Initiative.

    Portuguese speakers, read more about the launch from Diário de Moçambique here: Sofala, Manica, Zambézia e Gaza:Vinte milhões de dólares para apoio a pessoas desfavorecidas

    March 19, 2017 Bantwana officially launched the Força à Comunidade e às Crianças (Child and Community Strengthening Project) (FCC) Project on March 17, 2017, in Beira city, Sofala Province. The FCC Project aims to to reduce the socio-economic impact of HIV/AIDS on Orphaned & Vulnerable Children (OVC) and their caregivers by enhancing the capacity of families and communities ...
  • DREAM Again – New video on empowering girls in Zimbabwe

    January 23, 2017

    World Education’s Bantwana Initiative is a proud partner of the DREAMS Initiative, working to reduce new HIV infections among adolescent girls and young women by 40 percent in ten sub-Saharan countries. In a new video from USAID Zimbabwe, learn more about DREAMS and the partnership’s commitment to an AIDS-free generation.

    Bantwana empowers adolescent girls and young women to protect their health and well-being, continue their education, and gain critical life and employment skills. Learn more about our DREAMS programming in Zimbabwe.

    In sub-Saharan Africa, girls and young women account for over 70 percent of new HIV infections among adolescents. DREAMS is an ambitious $385 million partnership to reduce HIV infections among adolescent girls and young women. The goal of DREAMS is to help girls develop into Determined, Resilient, Empowered, AIDS-free, Mentored, and Safe women.

    Through the DREAMS Initiative, Bantwana is partnering with USAID, The U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), SAfAIDS, Population Services International, Africaid Zvandiri, UNICEF Zimbabwe, and FACT MUTARE to reduce new HIV infections and empower girls and women.

    With support from the U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Girl Effect, Johnson & Johnson, Gilead Sciences, and ViiV Healthcare, DREAMS is addressing a variety of factors that directly and indirectly increase girls’ HIV risk, including poverty, gender inequality, sexual violence, and a lack of education.

    January 23, 2017 World Education’s Bantwana Initiative is a proud partner of the DREAMS Initiative, working to reduce new HIV infections among adolescent girls and young women by 40 percent in ten sub-Saharan countries. In a new video from USAID Zimbabwe, learn more about DREAMS and the partnership’s commitment to an AIDS-free generation. Bantwana empowers adolescent girls ...
  • World AIDS Day 2016

    Today and every day, WEI/Bantwana strives to improve the wellbeing of vulnerable children and their caregivers and families affected by HIV and AIDS and poverty.

    We strive to help all vulnerable children—especially adolescent girls and young women—live HIV free.

    Yearly, there are around 380,000 new HIV infections among young womeno-greater-action-is-neededn aged 15-24. These young women are often left without a voice or control of their own bodies. They are prevented from protecting themselves against HIV due to reasons such as gender-based violence, lack of access to health services, lack of access to education, and policies that do not translate into action.

    We believe, however, that together we can end AIDS by 2030. In agreement with AIDS.gov, it is going to take leadership, commitment, and impact to make it happen.

    Join us in celebrating the progress we and our partners have made and in reaffirming our shared commitment to end AIDS by 2030. Below are links to our social media accounts, where we will be posting statistics and information about our efforts throughout the day, and additional information about our programming and success stories.

    Follow us. Engage with us.

    Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Instagram  |  16 Days GBV Campaign

    Bantwana Fact Sheet

    Fact Sheet bantwanaonepager_hivfocus-1

    DREAMS Programming

    DREAMS  – bantwanadreams_onepager_a4

    Country Fact Sheets – Mozambique, Swaziland, Uganda, Zimbabwe

    DREAMS Innovation

    Success Stories

    Pamoja Tuwalee (Tanzania) – Steven

    DREAMS (Uganda) – Anna and Flavia

    BETTER OUTCOMES (Uganda) – Jennifer, RoseVicki

    International AIDS Conference 2016 Poster

    School-based HIV prevention education for the world’s highest HIV prevalence population

    Today and every day, WEI/Bantwana strives to improve the wellbeing of vulnerable children and their caregivers and families affected by HIV and AIDS and poverty. We strive to help all vulnerable children—especially adolescent girls and young women—live HIV free. Yearly, there are around 380,000 new HIV infections among young women aged 15-24. These young women are often left ...
  • 16 Days of Activism Against GBV

    It is estimated that 35% of women and girls worldwide have experienced gender-based violence (GBV). GBV is a social and human rights problem that is rooted in social inequalities among men and women. It is a problem that occurs in all parts of the globe, and while GBV has gained more attention over the years, it remains inadequate.

    Gender-based violence covers child sexual abuse, sex trafficking, sexual assault, domestic violence, early child marriage, violence in schools, female genital mutilation/cutting, forced labor and more. Roughly 70 million women have been married before the age of 18, and 120 million have experienced forced intercourse or other forced sexual acts at some point. Even with an alarmingly high number of women and girls suffering different forms of violence every day, fewer than 40% ever report it.

    This year, the Bantwana Initiative is participating in 16 Days of Activism against Gender-Based Violence under the campaign’s theme, “From Peace in the Home to Peace in the World: Make Education Safe for All.” WEI/Bantwana knows that education is one of the the most effective ways to end GBV and is committed to helping make public spaces, schools and homes safe for all women and girls worldwide!

    Get Involved!

    Join Bantwana in taking part of the 16 Days campaign by following us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

    Watch a video based on the true story of a GBV survivor in Zimbabwe, and learn how we empower survivors of GBV to access comprehensive medical, psychosocial, and legal support in Zimbabwe.

    Make a donation to support World Education/Bantwana’s work to reduce gender-based violence.

    Check out a new photo essay, ’10 Ways to Empower Girls’ to find out how World Education and Bantwana are working to topple the gender barriers that prevent girls form getting an education.

    Download our tools and resources on gender and GBV:

    Learn more about a few of our upcoming projects:

    Learn more about our current GBV projects or innovations:

    It is estimated that 35% of women and girls worldwide have experienced gender-based violence (GBV). GBV is a social and human rights problem that is rooted in social inequalities among men and women. It is a problem that occurs in all parts of the globe, and while GBV has gained more attention over the years, ...
  • Bantwana DREAMS at #AIDS2016!

    Just announced by the DREAMS Partnership at the International Aids Conference in Durban, South Africa: World Education has been selected as a DREAMS Innovation Challenge winner!

    Our solution was selected from more than 800 ideas to bring innovative, high-impact approaches to empower young women and adolescent girls in 10 Sub-Saharan African countries to live HIV-free. We’re excited to continue our role as a DREAMS implementer in Zimbabwe, Swaziland, Uganda, and Mozambique and a PEPFAR OVC implementing partner in Tanzania.

    For this challenge, we will work to increase secondary school retention among pregnant girls and young mothers in Swaziland, Tanzania, and Zimbabwe. Keeping girls in secondary school dramatically reduces their vulnerability to HIV infection. Therefore, we will develop an early warning system to detect girls most at risk of dropout, address harmful norms, and link them to health services.

    “While we have made considerable progress in the global response to HIV/AIDS, it remains the leading cause of death for adolescent girls in Africa, and girls account for 75% of all new HIV infections among adolescents. This must change.”   – Ambassador Deborah L. Birx

    As a DREAMS Innovation Challenge winner, we will strive to help drive those changes! Congratulations to all the other winners, and thank you U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR); Janssen Pharmaceutica NV (Janssen), one of the Janssen pharmaceutical companies of Johnson & Johnson; and ViiV Healthcare!

    Just announced by the DREAMS Partnership at the International Aids Conference in Durban, South Africa: World Education has been selected as a DREAMS Innovation Challenge winner! Our solution was selected from more than 800 ideas to bring innovative, high-impact approaches to empower young women and adolescent girls in 10 Sub-Saharan African countries to live HIV-free. We’re excited to continue our ...
  • Bantwana DREAMS Programming

    The Bantwana Initiative is currently implementing DREAMS Innovation Challenge funds in Mozambique, Swaziland, Uganda, and Zimbabwe. The DREAMS Innovation Challenge (DREAMS-IC) is a joint initiative between PEPFAR, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Girl Effect, Johnson & Johnson, Gilead Sciences, and Viiv Healthcare with the goal of helping adolescent girls and young women become Determined, Resilient, Empowered, AIDS-free, Mentored, and Safe Women.

    As recipient of DREAMS-IC funds, Bantwana incorporates DREAMS objectives with existing programming for orphans and vulnerable children. Bantwana will focus on strengthening comprehensive services to reduce the risk of HIV infection among adolescent girls and young women in these four DREAMS-IC priority countries.

    Uganda

    In Uganda, Bantwana provides adolescent girls and young women an array of life skills (HIV prevention, adolescent reproductive and sexual health, child protection) and economic strengthening interventions. Bantwana’s DREAMS interventions will help adolescent girls protect themselves from HIV and abuse while offering career guidance and building their financial literacy and entrepreneurial skills. Bantwana will:

    • Implement parenting groups for caregivers and teens to strengthen intergenerational communication to help participants discuss sensitive topics like reproductive health and HIV prevention
    • Use parasocial workers who are trained in community case management to help link girls and caregivers to critical services along the HIV continuum as well as other important socio-economic services
    • Encourage caregivers and girls to enroll in financial savings groups to build household resiliency to crisis

    Mozambique

    In Mozambique, the DREAMS program will target more than 158,850 adolescent girls and young women between the ages of 10 and 24 in three provinces, including girls who are in- and out-of-school, pregnant, and or postpartum and breastfeeding. Key interventions include sexual and reproductive health radio listening programs, school and community girls’ clubs, and sporting events with on-site gender-based violence (GBV) prevention outreach services and HIV service providers. Bantwana will:

    • Encourage caregivers to participate in financial savings groups to increase economic resilience and help keep girls in school
    • Establish parenting groups to help participants overcome barriers around sexuality and sexual health risk conversations with their children
    • Launch a case management referral system to help the most vulnerable girls and their families through home visits and will strengthen coordinated service providers

    Zimbabwe

    In Zimbabwe, the Bantwana DREAMS project is offering 3,000 young women a comprehensive package of services to improve their health and well-being. Among the many efforts, Bantwana will:

    • Establish  internal savings and lending (ISAL) clubs to build members’ financial skills
    • Provide entrepreneurial skills training to help participants start small businesses
    • Link work readiness model with internships in private and public sector companies to prepare girls for employment
    • Train all girls with a GBV prevention curriculum that emphasizes adolescent sexual reproductive health education and HIV prevention

    Swaziland

    In Swaziland, Bantwana supports DREAMS programming as a sub-grantee to PACT, reaching 2,550 girls and young women between the ages of 10 and 24 with life skills and health education services in the Lubombo region. Key DREAMS platforms for Swaziland include:

    • Volunteer-run clubs for in-and-out of school adolescent girls
    • Health clubs attached to local clinics for HIV-positive adolescent boys and girls
    • Referrals for testing, treatment, and support for HIV-positive adolescents
    • Tracking treatment and adherence for HIV-positive adolescents
    • School grants to cover school fees for at-risk girls
    The Bantwana Initiative is currently implementing DREAMS Innovation Challenge funds in Mozambique, Swaziland, Uganda, and Zimbabwe. The DREAMS Innovation Challenge (DREAMS-IC) is a joint initiative between PEPFAR, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Girl Effect, Johnson & Johnson, Gilead Sciences, and Viiv Healthcare with the goal of helping adolescent girls and young women become Determined, Resilient, ...
  • David Beckham Visits Bantwana-Supported Clinic in Swaziland

    David Beckham, international soccer star, paid an unheralded visit to a Bantwana-supported clinic in Swaziland on June 8, 2016. The former captain of the English national football team and UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador was there to help raise awareness about orphaned and vulnerable youth.

    Bantwana runs a support group for adolescent girls affected by HIV at the Siphofaneni Clinic as part of a broader project designed to reduce the high prevalence of HIV throughout Swaziland.

    David Beckham, Bantwana Initiative, Swaziland

    David Beckham spoke with children when visiting the Siphofaneni Clinic in Swaziland. Photo: Daily Mail.

    Fifteen HIV positive adolescent mothers and their children arrived at Siphofaneni expecting to meet with their support group. They were surprised to enter the facility and instead see superstar Beckham meeting with children.
    Beckham then took the time to speak with each mother individually; learning their stories and spending quality time with their children.

    Read about the visit in BellaAfrica. Thank you, David Beckham, for advocating for the vulnerable women and children working to function as healthy, productive members of their communities.

    David Beckham, international soccer star, paid an unheralded visit to a Bantwana-supported clinic in Swaziland on June 8, 2016. The former captain of the English national football team and UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador was there to help raise awareness about orphaned and vulnerable youth. Bantwana runs a support group for adolescent girls affected by HIV at the ...
  • New video highlights youth livelihoods development in Zimbabwe

    World Education’s Bantwana Initiative has produced a new video that highlights the issues facing youth around employment and livelihoods development in Zimbabwe and across southern Africa.

    Check out the video, The Bantwana Initiative: Youth Entrepreneurship and Work Readiness Program, on YouTube.

    Our new video, The Bantwana Initiative: Youth Entrepreneurship and Work Readiness Program, highlights the issues facing youth around employment and livelihoods development in Zimbabwe and across southern Africa.